reblogged 2 weeks ago
03 Oct 2014 4 notes
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  #specialagentabigailbrand  

specialagentabigailbrand:

"No, no. Your plight is other people."

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"you hate them."

          “I have multiple plights.”

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reblogged 3 weeks ago
30 Sep 2014 4 notes
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  #specialagentabigailbrand  

specialagentabigailbrand:

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"Earth smells … worse than I remember."

          “Now you understand my plight.”

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imgonnashoottothrill said:
Insomnia, Beverage and Vice

a-z headcanons (x)

—> insomnia :: what’s their sleeping schedule like? snorer? sound sleeper?

     Churchill’s sleeping schedule is usually one of two extremes. He counts as a workaholic— he’ll be that agent still typing away at midnight with the office lights still on, simply to get as much work done as possible. He’s not really an insomniac, which means that it is possible to catch him asleep on his desk, but you might get a lamp thrown at you if you do.

     When his sleeping schedule isn’t screwed up by work, he ends up asleep somewhere around ten or eleven at night. He’s not a very sound sleeper (history has proven that he will wake up if someone taps on his window), but doesn’t make a sound while asleep. Might as well not be breathing at all.

—> beverage :: what do they most like to drink, and why?

     Coffee. It does wonders for late nights and early mornings. Tea is a close second, along with the belief that it makes afternoons more peaceful.

—> vice :: what bad habits do they have? is there something they would be ashamed of?

     Churchill is usually very careful not to delve into most mainstream vices, except where alcohol is concerned. He doesn’t ever overdo it (save for one night a long time ago), but does take comfort in drink and always has it in one form or another somewhere around his apartment. He never drinks in public and goes to great lengths to avoid anyone seeing him under its influence.

reblogged 3 weeks ago
29 Sep 2014 9 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #kingoftheravens  

kingoftheravens:

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    “I never said they were forgotten. I was saying that calling authorities simply because of my presence will accomplish nothing, especially since I have done nothing to you.”

     ”A fact of which I have willingly accepted, under the circumstances you’ve explained.”

          “But how else am I going to impress upon you just how loathed you are?”

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reblogged 3 weeks ago
29 Sep 2014 6 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #kneeltotheplayboy  

kneel-to-the-playboy:

"I’m Tony Sta- I shouldn’t have to explain who I am, who are you?"

     ”Certainly someone too far unworthy of your attention, Mr. Stark.” The agent responded, obvious with his use of sarcasm. “As you are of mine. Your name does not grant you privilege everywhere.”

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posted 3 weeks ago
29 Sep 2014 0 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #open  

          “Unhand my book. It is far beyond your reading level.”

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answered 3 weeks ago
28 Sep 2014 0 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #IJUST    #...ok    #I won't deny I thought about it    #ooc    #Anonymous  
Anonymous said:
trygve / churchill tho
Send me a ship and i’ll rate it:

ship: ew / nonono / maybe / ship it / aww / otp / MY HEART

reblogged 3 weeks ago
28 Sep 2014 98,762 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #askbox    #ooc  

ship: ew / nonono / maybe / ship it / aww / otp / MY HEART 

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reblogged 3 weeks ago
28 Sep 2014 6 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #givin you a lecture    #apparently    #fc  
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reblogged 3 weeks ago
28 Sep 2014 17 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #things john likes    #long post    #ooooh  

conspiracy-subrosa:

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It refers to the mysterious deaths of nine ski hikers in the northern mountains on the night of February 2, 1959. The incident happened on the east shoulder of the mountain Kholat Syakhl (meaning Dead Mountain). The mountain pass where the incident occurred has since been named Dyatlov Pass after the group’s leader, Igor Dyatlov.

The chronology of the incident remains unclear because there were no survivors.

Investigators at the time determined that the hikers tore open their tent from within because they fled (however, it is not known from what), departing barefoot into heavy snow and a temperature of −30 °C (−22 °F). Although the corpses showed no signs of struggle, two victims had fractured skulls, two had broken ribsand one was missing parts of her face due to postmortem decay. 

Background:

A group was formed for a ski trek across the northern Urals in Sverdlovsk Oblast. The original group, led by Igor Dyatlov, consisted of eight men and two women (the tenth hiker was Yuri Yefimovich Yudin, however Yuri was ill and so did not go). Most were students or graduates.

The goal of the expedition was to reach Otorten, a mountain 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) north of the site of the incident. This route, at that season, was estimated as Category III, the most difficult. All members were experienced in long ski tours and mountain expeditions.

What happened:

Diaries and cameras found around their last campsite made it possible to track the group’s route up to the day preceding the incident. On January 31st, the group arrived at the edge of a highland area and began to prepare for climbing. In a wooded valley they cached surplus food and equipment that would be used for the trip back. The following day (February 1at), the hikers started to move through the pass. It seems they planned to get over the pass and make camp for the next night on the opposite side, but because of worsening weather conditions, snowstorms and decreasing visibility, they lost their direction and deviated west, up towards the top of Kholat Syakhyl. When they realized their mistake, the group decided to stop and set up camp there on the slope of the mountain, rather than moving 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) downhill to a forested area which would have offered some shelter from the elements. Yudin, the lone survivor, postulated that “Dyatlov probably did not want to lose the altitude they had gained, or he decided to practice camping on the mountain slope.”

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Before leaving, Dyatlov had agreed he would send a telegram to their sports club as soon as the group returned to Vizhai. It was expected that this would happen no later than February 12th, but Dyatlov had told Yudin, before his departure from the group, that he expected to be longer. When the 12th passed and no messages had been received, there was no immediate reaction, as delays of a few days were common with such expeditions. It was not until the relatives of the travellers demanded a rescue operation on February 20th that the head of the institute sent the first rescue groups, consisting of volunteer students and teachers.

On February 26, the searchers found the group’s abandoned and badly damaged tent on Kholat Syakhl. Mikhail Sharavin, the student who found the tent, said “the tent was half torn down and covered with snow. It was empty, and all the group’s belongings and shoes had been left behind.”Investigators said the tent had been cut open from inside. Eight or nine sets of footprints, left by people who were wearing only socks, a single shoe or were even barefoot, could be followed, leading down toward the edge of a nearby woods, on the opposite side of the pass, 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) to the north-east. However, after 500 metres (1,600 ft) these tracks were covered with snow. At the forest’s edge, under a large cedar, the searchers found the remains of a fire, along with the first two bodies, those of Krivonischenko and Doroshenko, shoeless and dressed only in their underwear. The branches on the tree were broken up to five meters high, suggesting that one of the skiers had climbed up to look for something, perhaps the camp. Between the cedar and the camp the searchers found three more corpses, Dyatlov, Kolmogorova and Slobodin, who seemed to have died in poses suggesting that they were attempting to return to the tentThey were found separately at distances of 300, 480 and 630 meters from the tree.

Searching for the remaining four travellers took more than two months. They were finally found on May 4th under four meters of snow in a ravine 75 meters farther into the woods from the cedar tree. These four were better dressed than the others, and there were signs that those who had died first had apparently relinquished their clothes to the others. Zolotaryov was wearing Dubinina’s faux fur coat and hat, while Dubinina’s foot was wrapped in a piece of Krivonishenko’s wool pants.

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Theories:

There was initially speculation that the indigenous Mansi people might have attacked and murdered the group for encroaching upon their lands, but investigation indicated that the nature of their deaths did not support this hypothesis; the hikers’ footprints alone were visible, and they showed no sign of hand-to-hand struggle.

The official Soviet investigator into the tragedy, Lev Ivanov, could find no answers. He concluded in his hastily composed report that all nine deaths had been caused by what he described as ‘an unknown elemental force which they were unable to overcome’. Privately, he told people he thought they’d been killed by aliens in a UFO. The hikers were camping in an area about 32-miles south of Kholat Syakhl on the night in question when they spied a series of “strange orange spheres in the Northern sky. During the next month and a half other residents of the area report similar anomalous aerial phenomenon.

There is another theory that the group was killed by a yeti. In Siberia, it was known to the locals as the Almas. They speculate that the terrifying roar of the beast might have sent the team into a panic, resulting in their poorly prepared escape into the snow

The two primary reasons for the existence of this theory are the seemingly inexplicable impact wounds found on the skulls and torsos of nearly half of the corpses and an as yet an unverified piece of paper that was allegedly discovered near the campsite which readFrom now on we know there are snowmen.”

Mike Libecki says, “When I found out one of the students was missing a tongue immediately I knew this was not caused by an avalanche. Something ripped out the tongue of this woman.” 

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